Celadon Jade Buckle Two Immortals

Celadon Jade Buckle Two Immortals
Celadon Jade Buckle Two Immortals.

A carved pale celadon jade “Two Immortals” Belt Buckle, Qianlong Period (1736-1795)

The jades are carved as the two laughing twins ‘He He Erxian’ holding large lotus leaves. The gilt-bronze mounting is decorated with a dragon-head hook and a lingzhi-shaped loop. The reverse is cast with scrolling lotus in open work. The stones are of a celadon tone with flecked white inclusions.
5 in. (12.7 cm.) wide

Sold for USD 3500.00 at Christies.

Fine Old Chinese Celadon Nephrite Jade Belt Hook Buckle DOUBLE DRAGONS

$14.50 (3 Bids)
End Date: Tuesday Jun-19-2018 18:38:34 PDT
Bid now | Add to watch list

Nice Hand Carved Chinese Celadon Jade Belt Buckle

$688.88
End Date: Sunday Jul-1-2018 9:28:34 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $688.88
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

Rare Asian Antique Belt buckle Vermeil Fine Hand Carved Celadon Jade Accented

$1,250.00
End Date: Sunday Jun-24-2018 11:37:01 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $1,250.00
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

Chinese Celadon Jade Belt Buckle.

$245.00
End Date: Tuesday Jul-10-2018 12:02:05 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $245.00
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

Antique Chinese Nephrite Celadon-HETIAN-Jade Statues Fengshui buckle-Dragon

$8.59 (3 Bids)
End Date: Tuesday Jun-19-2018 20:58:14 PDT
Bid now | Add to watch list

Antique Carved Hetian Celadon Jade Belt Buckle, China, Dragon Design

$225.00
End Date: Friday Jun-29-2018 23:21:35 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $225.00
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

Antique Chilong Dragon Belt Hook Qing Dynasty Buckle - Celadon Jade

$420.00
End Date: Wednesday Jul-4-2018 11:00:50 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $420.00
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

The Qianlong Emperor (25 September 1711 – 7 February 1799) was the sixth emperor of the Manchu-led Qing dynasty, and the fourth Qing emperor to rule over China proper. Born Hongli, the fourth son of the Yongzheng Emperor, he reigned officially from 11 October 1735 to 8 February 1796. On 8 February, he abdicated in favour of his son, the Jiaqing Emperor – a filial act in order not to reign longer than his grandfather, the illustrious Kangxi Emperor.  Despite his retirement, however, he retained ultimate power as the Emperor Emeritus (or Retired Emperor) until his death in 1799; he thus was the longest-reigning de facto ruler in the history of China, and dying at the age of 87, the longest-living. As a capable and cultured ruler inheriting a thriving empire, during his long reign the Qing Empire reached its most splendid and prosperous era, boasting a large population and economy. As a military leader, he led military campaigns expanding the dynastic territory to the largest extent by conquering and sometimes destroying Central Asian kingdoms. This turned around in his late years: the Qing empire began to decline with corruption and wastefulness in his court and a stagnating civil society.

He-He Er Xian, which is depicted on this celadon jade buckle, translated as the Immortals of Harmony and Union and as the Two gods of Harmony and Union, are two Taoist immortals. They are popularly associated with happy marriages. He and He are typically depicted as boys holding a lotus flower (荷, hé) and a box (盒, hé). Reference Wikipedia